Onitsha


      Onitsha
Onitsha tells the story of Fintan, a youth who travels to Africa in 1948 with his Italian mother to join the English father he has never met Fintan is initially enchanted by the exotic world he discovers in Onitsha, a bustling city prominently situated on the eastern bank of the Niger River But gradually he comes to recognize the intolerance and brutality of the colonial system His youthful point of view provides the novel with a notably direct, horrified perspective on racism and colonialism In the words of translator Alison Anderson, Onitsha is remarkable for its almost mythological evocation of local history and beliefs It is full of atmosphere sights, sounds, smells and at times the author s sentences seem to flow with the dreamy languor of the river itself But J M G Le Cl zio never lets us forget the harsh realities of life nor the subsequent tragedy of war A startling account and indictment of colonialism, Onitsha is also a work of clear, forthright prose that ably portrays both colonial Nigeria and a young boy s growing outrage. Free Download [ Onitsha ] By [ J.M.G. Le Clézio ] For Kindle ePUB or eBook – tbjewellers.co.uk

Jean Marie Gustave Le Cl zio, better known as J.M.G Le Cl zio born 13 April 1940 is a Franco Mauritian novelist The author of over forty works, he was awarded the 1963 Prix Renaudot for his novel Le Proc s Verbal The Interrogation and the 2008 Nobel Prize in Literature.

Free Download [ 
      Onitsha
 ] author [ J.M.G. Le Clézio ] – tbjewellers.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 206 pages
  • Onitsha
  • J.M.G. Le Clézio
  • English
  • 13 November 2019
  • 0803279663

10 thoughts on “ Onitsha

  1. says:

    One of the best books I ve read recently The language is rich, elegant, evocative.

  2. says:

    Heart of AfricaIs it possible to write of a journey upriver into the African heartland without falling into the shadow ofHeart of DarknessAnd yet the example of Conrad s masterpiece need not be a dead weight, as Onitsha, the 1992 novel by the recent Nobel laureate J M G Le Cl zio, proves As Conrad had done, Le Cl zio begins his book with a long voyage by water, in this case from Bordeaux along the coast of Africa to the mouth of the River Niger His protagonist is a young boy, Fintan, Heart of AfricaIs it possible to write of a journey upriver into the African heartland without falling into the shadow ofHeart of DarknessAnd yet the example of Conrad s masterpiece need not be a dead weight, as Onitsha, the 1992 novel by the recent Nobel laureate J M G Le Cl zio, proves As Conrad had done, Le Cl zio begins his book with a long voyage by water, in this case from Bordeaux along the coast of Africa to the mouth of the River Niger His protagonist is a young boy, Fintan, who travels with his Italian mother nicknamed Maou to join his English father Geoffroy Allen, whom he has never seen, worki...

  3. says:

    It wasnt until the end of the novel that I really connected this novel with Chimamanda Ngozi Adichies novel, Half of a Yellow Sun which was based on the Biafran War in the 1960ies where the eastern part of Nigeria, primarily represented by the Igbo people, were hounded into succession and an attempt to found their own state Or that I began to wonder why s...

  4. says:

    Wow Like many other bemused Indian booklovers, I bought this book because it was the only work by this year s Nobel winner available in stores and I wanted to know what the fuss was all about I came away moved and impressed convinced that, if Le Clezio generally writes at this level, the Nobel is well deserved It s the story of a young European boy and his mother who move to Nigeria to be with his English father, his family s various engagements with the country, its people and its heritage Wow Like many other bemused Indian booklovers, I bought this book because it was the only work by this year s Nobel winner available in stores and I wanted to know what the fuss was all about I came away moved and impressed convinced that, if Le Clezio generally writes at this level, the Nobel is well deserved It s the story of a young European boy and his mother who move to Nigeria to be with his English father, his family s various engagements with the country, its people and its heritage and their various conflicts with those who heartily accept the colonial scheme of things Displaced many times over, from his native Europe, from his adopted Africa ...

  5. says:

    Africa burns like a secret, like a fever Slowness, that was it, a very long and regular movement, like the water of the river flowing towards the sea, like the clouds, like the sweltering afternoon heatLife came to a halt, as if time were weighted Onitsha, a town on the bank of the River Niger, once capital to the ...

  6. says:

    I ran into Sherman Alexie the other day and we talked about reading Nobel winners after they have been chosen for the award We read these authors with a particular scrutiny since we know what apparently the rest of the world thinks of his her work That said, I really enjoyed Onitsha LeClezio is a model post colonial author, balancing European guilt and apology with the complicated paternalism of the colonists tribal envy He outlines these roles through the young and resilient main I ran into Sherman Alexie the ...

  7. says:

    hmmm that was really awesome coz that author really deceived me..when have seen his photo I was just shocked to see a white half frenchman such an objective and clearly explained, empathic workyou gonna love the point of viewgonna experience all the things pro con fromm th...

  8. says:

    Interesting to see how memoiristic materials from LeClezio s The African gets worked into fiction here I find myself getting irritated at the side plot subplot , which distracted from the central storyline, although it did in fact eventu...

  9. says:

    Not so much happens in this book Another writer might have compressed the events into a short story, but then again, the slow pace mimics the way that time is experienced by children Le Clezio is known for his descriptive writing, and there are definitely plenty of phrases worth lingering over...

  10. says:

    I am not so impressed Possibly not deep enough Confusing with all the names and it would have helped to have some type of preface author s note to check into to have some clue of part of the passages.

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