From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America


      From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America
In the United States today, one in every 31 adults is under some form of penal control, including one in eleven African American men How did the land of the free become the home of the world s largest prison system Challenging the belief that America s prison problem originated with the Reagan administration s War on Drugs, Elizabeth Hinton traces the rise of mass incarceration to an ironic source the social welfare programs of Lyndon Johnson s Great Society at the height of the civil rights era.Johnson s War on Poverty policies sought to foster equality and economic opportunity But these initiatives were also rooted in widely shared assumptions about African Americans role in urban disorder, which prompted Johnson to call for a simultaneous War on Crime The 1965 Law Enforcement Assistance Act empowered the national government to take a direct role in militarizing local police Federal anti crime funding soon incentivized social service providers to ally with police departments, courts, and prisons Under Richard Nixon and his successors, welfare programs fell by the wayside while investment in policing and punishment expanded Anticipating future crime, policy makers urged states to build new prisons and introduced law enforcement measures into urban schools and public housing, turning neighborhoods into targets of police surveillance.By the 1980s, crime control and incarceration dominated national responses to poverty and inequality The initiatives of that decade were less a sharp departure than the full realization of the punitive transformation of urban policy implemented by Republicans and Democrats alike since the 1960s. Best Read Books From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America by Elizabeth Hinton – tbjewellers.co.uk

Elizabeth Hinton is Assistant Professor in the Department History and the Department of African and African American Studies at Harvard University Hinton s research focuses on the persistence of poverty and racial inequality in the 20th century United States Her current scholarship considers the transformation of domestic social programs and urban policing after the Civil Rights Movement.In her forthcoming book, From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime The Making of Mass Incarceration in America with Harvard University Press , Hinton examines the implementation of federal law enforcement programs beginning in the mid 1960s that laid the groundwork for the mass incarceration of American citizens In revealing the links between the rise of the American carceral state and earlier anti poverty programs, Hinton presents Ronald Reagan s War on Drugs not as a sharp policy departure but rather as the full realization of a shift towards surveillance and confinement that began during the Johnson administration.Before joining the Harvard faculty, Hinton spent two years as a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Michigan Society of Fellows and Assistant Professor in the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies at the University of Michigan A Ford Foundation Fellow, Hinton completed her Ph.D in United States History from Columbia University in 2012.Hinton s articles and op eds can be found in the pages of the Journal of American History, the Journal of Urban History, and Time She also co edited The New Black History Revisiting the Second Reconstruction Palgrave Macmillan, 2011 with the late historian Manning Marable.

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  • Hardcover
  • 464 pages
  • From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America
  • Elizabeth Hinton
  • English
  • 25 December 2019
  • 0674737237

10 thoughts on “ From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America

  1. says:

    If you liked the New Jim Crow, you will love this academic re telling of that story Hinton rejects the simple narrative that the war on crime came under Nixon and Reagan, but shows that it started creeping in with Kennedy and...

  2. says:

    This comprehensive book explores how the Civil Rights Era directly facilitated the modern carceral state, through the initiatives of Republicans and Democrats alike At a recent remove, our prison populations matched the complexion of our country But images of cities being torn apart by non white agitators and the specter of non white people with power, demanding rights shook genteel, suburban America to the core The flip side of the Great Society of dubious lasting success was Law and This comprehensive book explores how the Civil Rights Era directly facilitated the modern carceral state, through the initiatives of Republicans and Democrats alike At a recent remove, our prison populations matched the complexion of our country But images of cities being torn apart by non white agitators and the specter of non white people with power, demanding rights shook genteel, suburban America to the core The flip side of the Great Society of dubious lasting success was Law and Order, a regime that continues to thrive and enforce racial injustices that seem almost Apartheid esque in their dispro...

  3. says:

    If you are only going to read one book on mass incarceration and inequality, you should read The New Jim Crow by Michele Alexander However, if you would like to read additional books on the subject, I definitely recommend this one Hinton s book goes back farther in time to recount the history of of the war on poverty, masked as the war on crime While the beginning of the book did not grab me right away, I was really appreciative of Hinton s focus on the academic liberal s depiction of black If you are only going to read one book on mass incarceration and inequality, you should read The New Jim Crow by Michele Alexander However, if you would like to read additional books on the subject, I definitely recommend this one Hinton s book goes back farther in time to recount the history of of the war on poverty, masked as the war on crime While the beginning of the book did not grab me right away, I was really appreciative of Hinton s focus on the academic liberal s depiction of black people Just as in Dunieier s book Ghetto, Hinton includes an impressive explanation of some of the most important insights from academics that served to both inform policy at the political level and inform ideology at the societal level In addition, she tied what was going on in ...

  4. says:

    I wanted to like this bookthan I actually did like it This left me largely flat I think that s largely because of the focus academic tomes that focus heavily on the bureaucratic process of Washington DC and legislative back and forth are never my favorites Yeah, it s a legitimate way of exploring topics, but it also feels lifeless Some of my favorite parts here are when Hinton gets into specific examples, such as police programs in Detroit or LA and the impact that had on communities I wanted to like this bookthan I actually did like it This left me largely flat I think that s largely because of the focus academic tomes that focus heavily on the bureaucratic process of Washington DC and legislative back and forth are never my favorites Yeah, it s a legitimate way of exploring topics, but it also feels lifeless Some of my favorite parts here are when Hinton gets into specific examples, such as police programs in Detroit or LA and the impact that had on communities I could ve usedof that to provide a sense of life Also, I think the book at times led too strongly with opinion and the author s own POV I have no problem with an author having a POV heck, I have a problem with an author lacking one but if you lead too strongly with it, you...

  5. says:

    Book covers the growth of Law Enforcement and early trends in the militarization of police, increase of incarceration in both sentences and number of inmates, and the eclipsing of the war on poverty by the war on crime The scope of this book is up until Reagan and the period most people associate with these trends This book shows that this was going on earlier than most historians recognize Granted mass incarceration in the 80s and 90s overshadows that of the 60s and 70s but the trend got Book covers the growth of Law Enforcement and early trends in the militarization of police, increase of incarceration in both sentences and number of inmates, and the eclipsing of the war on poverty by the war on crime The scope of this book is up until Reagan and the period most people associate with these trends This book shows that this was going on earlier than most historians recognize Granted mass incarceration in the 80s and 90s overshadows that of the 60s and 70s but the trend got started in this early period and had been gettingintense e...

  6. says:

    For the research purposes and why I read it , this packs a lot of information and food for thought Hinton proves how America s justice system has been formed on racism and inequality and still is However, it is not particularly easy to read, either in subject or writing wise It feels very heavy in many instances and you need to have some bac...

  7. says:

    This was an exceptionally well researched documented book and an interesting argument that nonetheless has some problems Here s the basic argument Hinton says that the roots of the War on Crime Drugs can actually be found in Great Society War on Poverty discourses policies about delinquency, the causes of poverty crime, and race She argues that WoP advocates saw problems in black society as coming largely from pathologies born of racism, family breakdown structure think Moynihan report This was an exceptionally well researched documented book and an interesting argument that nonetheless has some problems Here s the basic argument Hinton says that the roots of the War on Crime Drugs can actually be found in Great Society War on Poverty discourses policies about delinquency, the causes of poverty crime, and race She argues that WoP advocates saw problems in black society as coming largely from pathologies born of racism, family breakdown structure think Moynihan report and culture She cl...

  8. says:

    This was a good but sad book I think it s important to know this information, but nevertheless, it was a hard read for that reason.

  9. says:

    Easily one of the best most important history books on 20th century America.

  10. says:

    An important contribution to the history of mass incarceration, the focus here on federal policies beginning in the 1960s.

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