Have a Nice Doomsday: Why Millions of Americans Are Looking Forward to the End of the World

Have a Nice Doomsday: Why Millions of Americans Are Looking Forward to the End of the World➹ [Read] ➵ Have a Nice Doomsday: Why Millions of Americans Are Looking Forward to the End of the World By Nicholas Guyatt ➼ – Tbjewellers.co.uk In Have a Nice Doomsday, Nicholas Guyatt searches for the truth behind a startling statistic million Americans have come to believe that the apocalypse will take place in their lifetime They re convi In Have a Nice Doomsday, Nicholas Nice Doomsday: PDF ↠ Guyatt searches for the truth behind a startling statisticmillion Americans have come to believe that the apocalypse will take place in their lifetime They re convinced that, any day now, Jesus will snatch up his followers and spirit them to heaven The rest of us will be left behind to endure massive Have a ePUB ½ earthquakes, devastating wars, and the terrifying rise of the Antichrist But true believers aren t sitting around waiting for the Rapture They re getting involved in debates over abortion, gay rights, and even foreign policy Are they devout or deranged Does their influence stretch beyond America s religious heartland perhaps even to the White House Journeying from Texas megachurches a Nice Doomsday: MOBI ò to the southern California deserts and stopping off for a chat with prophecy superstar Tim LaHaye Guyatt looks for answers to some burning questions When will Russia attack Israel and ignite the Tribulation Does the president of Iran appear in Bible prophecy And is the Antichrist a homosexual Bizarre, funny, and unsettling in equal measure, Have a Nice Doomsday uncovers the apocalyptic obsessions at the heart of the world s only superpower.

Is a well known author, some Nice Doomsday: PDF ↠ of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Have a Nice Doomsday: Why Millions of Americans Are Looking Forward to the End of the World book, this is one of the most wanted Nicholas Guyatt author readers around the world.

Have a Nice Doomsday: Why Millions of Americans Are
    Have a Nice Doomsday: Why Millions of Americans Are uncovers the apocalyptic obsessions at the heart of the world s only superpower."/>
  • Paperback
  • 304 pages
  • Have a Nice Doomsday: Why Millions of Americans Are Looking Forward to the End of the World
  • Nicholas Guyatt
  • English
  • 09 January 2017
  • 0061152242

10 thoughts on “Have a Nice Doomsday: Why Millions of Americans Are Looking Forward to the End of the World

  1. says:

    When I was young I was told that Jesus would come back like a thief in the night It was said to me like it was a golden, glowing promise something sweet and something sure to happen any day now The words thief and night scared me to death, and since I was also told that no one would know the hour of his coming I would every day wake up and say with as much certainty as I could muster, Jesus is coming back today just to make sure that he wouldn t That said, I totally got this book I kn When I was young I was told that Jesus would come back like a thief in the night It was said to me like it was a golden, glowing promise something sweet and something sure to happen any day now The words thief and night scared me to death, and since I was also told that no one would know the hour of his coming I would every day wake up and say with as much certainty as I could muster, Jesus is coming back today just to make sure that he wouldn t That said, I totally got this book I knew where the author was going and was surprised at how respectful and clinical he remained One of my favorite passages in the book is advice that Tim Lahaye, co author of those horribly written Left Behind cash cows, gives the author Keep up the good work, and remember this The best way to reach the minds of people is the printed page God chose the printed page to communicate with mankind

  2. says:

    I am so fascinated by apocalyptic culture and this is a great look into some of the US s famous personalities like Tim La Haye, Joel Rosenberg and John Hagee Their political influence is pretty frightening, especially the fact that they are used as middle east experts on Fox news without disclosing that they believe war in the Middle East will hasten the apocalypse and their own rapture

  3. says:

    What you ll think of this book depends on what you re expecting it to be.If, like me, you re expecting a gentle mickey take of wacky American preachers rooted in end times prophecy as you d expect from the title and my edition s cover you ll be disappointed The book is reasonably easy to read in most places, although I got stuck around chapters 3 4, when you suddenly hit a block of solid history, detailing apocalyptic thinking from the past few hundred years for 50 pages or so Once you get b What you ll think of this book depends on what you re expecting it to be.If, like me, you re expecting a gentle mickey take of wacky American preachers rooted in end times prophecy as you d expect from the title and my edition s cover you ll be disappointed The book is reasonably easy to read in most places, although I got stuck around chapters 3 4, when you suddenly hit a block of solid history, detailing apocalyptic thinking from the past few hundred years for 50 pages or so Once you get back to the on the ground interviews and the current stuff, it becomes accessible onceIt was interesting to see how different people tackled the paradox of naturally wanting things to improve in the world, while knowing that things getting worse was a sign of the wanted apocalypse coming

  4. says:

    While mainly about American prophecy writers, I enjoyed the historical review of apocalyptic thought from the start of Christianity to Cromwell in England Shout out to the 5th Monarchist and their bloody fight in January 1661 For Americans, It was intriguing that for a time America was thought of as the safe place for Satan and his minions the native Americans , or so said the leading British prophecy guy or the 17th century Joseph Mede.But the killer stuff starts with William Miller in the While mainly about American prophecy writers, I enjoyed the historical review of apocalyptic thought from the start of Christianity to Cromwell in England Shout out to the 5th Monarchist and their bloody fight in January 1661 For Americans, It was intriguing that for a time America was thought of as the safe place for Satan and his minions the native Americans , or so said the leading British prophecy guy or the 17th century Joseph Mede.But the killer stuff starts with William Miller in the 1830 s and 40 s Who used replacement theology , so that America replaced Jerusalem as the place of Christ s return, a NEW Jerusalem But even though he convinced thousands of the return, it proved to be untrue and was labeled The Great Disappointment It is interesting that for so many the fact that the world isn t ruined by a great tribulation causes such dismay.The comes John Nelson Darby who is cited as identifying a literal return of the Jews to Israel as a true marker, and he is credited with promoting the idea for the rapture Guyatt sees him as the first of the modern prophecy line that goes on to Tim Lahaye, John Hagee and Hal LindsayOne recurring point of interest for Guyatt is whether these modern prophecy guys are actually promoting and working towards the end of the world, or the final battle When he asks them directly they say no, but I think that he thinks that their actions say otherwise THEY want a nuclear war in Israel.As to how this all comes aboutThese people feel that all they are doing is connecting the dots and once connected it is an amazingly clear picture of Rapture, Tribulation and Christ s angry return to earth But as I see it these dots of news and Bible quotes are analogous to a page full of random dots and if you have an image in mind you connect those dots that match the picture in your heart.I can imagine the allure of Biblical end times thought, after all it brings a wonderful clarity to the chaos of civilization and conflicting ways of life You identify evil and see yourself on the side of good And to really remedy the ills of the world you just point out the evil and wait for God s transport beam to materialize you up in heaven.And of course in a world that always seems to be getting worse rumors or wars and such , you have your proof of the correctness of you view.At the end he makes a claim that liberal non believers are like the bible end timers because they also think the world will end, except because of global warming It struck me as odd, since while it is true both types expect the world to end, one uses a very selective reading of the bible alone, while the other springs from years of data and thousands of actual scientist explaining this data So the equivalency thing seems weak to me.But, all in all, a good book He keeps the reader interested and provides a nice narrative to follow I think that narrative was stated as asking the phrophecisors to explain their views to those who don t come to them naturally But I really don t think those guys can t do that as they purposefully ignore evidence outside of their world view And really they don t care, they know what they believe even if they can t explain why and that is enough.HOWEVER, to explain it to others I think Guyatt should done somework, because the source material in this case can t deliver So I think this easy read, misses out on its actual intent.This is what I recommend Guyatt should read now to fill in that gap Cosmos, Chaos and the World to Come The Ancient Roots of Apocalyptic Faith by Norman Cohn I did not actually read this book but just from reading the jacket I see that the basic thrust of the book was that the apocalyptic world view was first introduce by the Zoroaster religion going back 3500 years The upshot is that their description of an ultimate combat between good and evil happens on earth with GOOD GOD winning So this way of thought long precedes modern American theology.Don t Even Think About It Why Our Brains Are Wired to Ignore Climate Change, by George Marshall Here we see that our brains are seemingly hardwired to react emotionally rather than rationally The Tenacity of Unreasonable Beliefs Fundamentalism and the Fear of Truth by Solomon Schimmel we see the benefits of ignoring a rational scientific way of handling evidence Basically this ties in with Marshall book in that ultimately it is the emotion satisfaction that determines what we believe

  5. says:

    Have a Nice Doomsday is a delightful read, but I start off with a caution if you expect the book to answer the question on the subtitle, Why millions of Americans are looking forward to the end of the world, you will leave disappointed Looking past this, I strongly recommend this book A British historian is intrigued by the popularity of the Left Behind series Americans used to thrive on the ideology that God had predestined America to be a light to the world, a shining city on the hill Have a Nice Doomsday is a delightful read, but I start off with a caution if you expect the book to answer the question on the subtitle, Why millions of Americans are looking forward to the end of the world, you will leave disappointed Looking past this, I strongly recommend this book A British historian is intrigued by the popularity of the Left Behind series Americans used to thrive on the ideology that God had predestined America to be a light to the world, a shining city on the hill but now we seem to be ready to abandon this planet To unravel this mystery, he visits megachurches, reads related books, and interviews many of the leading figures in the rapture ready Christian subculture At times he is incredulous at what people believe, but overall he maintains a respectful attitude He acknowledges the diversity within the movement and points out some of the human quirks and foibles within Within the subculture is a perplexing irony they celebrate that prophecies are seemingly being fulfilled, acknowleding that the end of days is near, but simultaneously fight for political movements that will stall the apocalypse The wars and rumors of wars that signal the impeding apocalypse serve as motivation, fuel for an evangelistic agenda But WHY do Americans love this What is it about the thought that we may be living in the last generation appeals to so many He dances around the question but doesn t give a satisfying answer Also missing is the question of what mainstream Christians think of this subculture A substantial portion of Christians don t buy into this drama, but this book doesn t address this distinction It doesn t really need to he s trying to understand this subculture and ideology, and what other subcultures think of it isn t strongly relevant But the informed reader needs to think of this If you re part of this subculture, I heartily recommend reading it to get an outsider s view Mainstream Christians need to engage in this dialogue as well Don t just read it to say wow, Xtians are crazy think about it And if you get an idea of why this ideology is so appealing, please, let me know

  6. says:

    An interesting read The author interviews several well known evangelical christian leaders with the end of the world as the main topic of discussion He pokes and prods, suggests and intimates, but never comes out and says what he seems to be thinking and probably what many people who choose to read this book are thinking he shifts back and forth between a slightly mocking tone of narration and that of a serious interviewer journalist Just when you think he s gonna hit you with his punch l An interesting read The author interviews several well known evangelical christian leaders with the end of the world as the main topic of discussion He pokes and prods, suggests and intimates, but never comes out and says what he seems to be thinking and probably what many people who choose to read this book are thinking he shifts back and forth between a slightly mocking tone of narration and that of a serious interviewer journalist Just when you think he s gonna hit you with his punch line of these people are all freaking nuts and they re influencing the leaders of our earth s nations he follows up with a different question or subject I d recommend this book to anyone interested in religion, especially the christian apocalypse version of the end of the world and how current political and religious leaders in the US view these topics I d like the bookif the author provided some editorial on what his thoughts are if he directly offered his opinion I wonder, though, if he disagrees with these folks and let it be known, they would have talked with him so openly

  7. says:

    I was very excited about this book and found myself a little dissapointed by the end A great idea exploring whythan 50 million Americans believe that the Second Coming, or at least the Rapture, will happen in their lifetime and the influence that this belief has on American foriegn policy ended up feeling forced and kind of shallow The author didn t even try to hide his condecension when interviewing and reviewing Bible prophecy enthusiasts, which I think it pretty irresponsible for re I was very excited about this book and found myself a little dissapointed by the end A great idea exploring whythan 50 million Americans believe that the Second Coming, or at least the Rapture, will happen in their lifetime and the influence that this belief has on American foriegn policy ended up feeling forced and kind of shallow The author didn t even try to hide his condecension when interviewing and reviewing Bible prophecy enthusiasts, which I think it pretty irresponsible for religious journalism He should have allowed the reader to make up his or her own mind regarding how crazy these people are my vote pretty damn crazy Still, it s an interesting topic Also, the author clearly wanted to uncover some kind of massive conspiracy where government officials and high ranking politicians were allowing Bible prophecy to influence their decision making and policy planning His thesis was never proven Sorry, even though George W Bush is an evangelical Christian, he is not looking for Gog and Magog in Russia

  8. says:

    It is bizarre that so many people are taken in by these ideas, but it is an interesting read Nicholas Guyatt is a Brit who tries to understand the American doomsday prophets and their message.

  9. says:

    Excellent In fact, it really explains it all I get it now.

  10. says:

    A pretty good report on the phenomena of Apocalyptic Christianity in America The tone wasrespectful than the goofy title and cover led me to believe it would be At the same time this is no somber report The book is breezy and conversational More an overview than an in depth study.The history of End Times belief is followed from its origins in England and we are shown how those beliefs moved to the New World even as they faded from Europe This history was pretty light, but that wasn t A pretty good report on the phenomena of Apocalyptic Christianity in America The tone wasrespectful than the goofy title and cover led me to believe it would be At the same time this is no somber report The book is breezy and conversational More an overview than an in depth study.The history of End Times belief is followed from its origins in England and we are shown how those beliefs moved to the New World even as they faded from Europe This history was pretty light, but that wasn t my primary interest in the book, so I didn t mind it.By far the most interesting parts of the book for me were the interviews with the End Times superstars and also rans Tim LaHaye and Joel Rosenberg are interesting guys While I don t doubt they sincerely believe their End Times eschatology, you can t help but feel that they aren t glorying in their celebrity a bit Guyatt lets them skewer themselves with their own words It never felt like he was holding these people up for ridicule, though he didn t gloss over some of the negative image they project on their own.The real revelation pardon the pun for me were some of the guys in the trenches The host of a cable access show Final Hour, the guy who felt a calling to sell his home and travel the country in an RV and Mel Odom, a Christian contract writer of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Sabrina the Teenage Witch novels who was hired to write a Tom Clancy esque spin off series to the Left Behind books These are regular work a day guys doing what they believe in but wrestling with some of the stickier questions of End Times belief The author gets them to grapple with their seemingly contradictory views that things must get worse in order to trigger The Rapture and at the same time that Christians should exercise their influence in politics in order to make America aChristian nation.Over all I would say Have A Nice Doomsday is a good introduction to End Times belief for anyone who s seen those Left Behind books and are wondering what that whole Rapture thing is about

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