Rethinking Rape

Rethinking Rape[EPUB] ✸ Rethinking Rape By Ann J. Cahill – Tbjewellers.co.uk Rape, claims Ann J Cahill, affects not only those women who are raped, but all women who experience their bodies as rapable and adjust their actions and self images accordingly Rethinking Rape counter Rape, claims Ann J Cahill, affects not only those women who are raped, but all women who experience their bodies as rapable and adjust their actions and self images accordingly Rethinking Rape counters legal and feminist definitions of rape as mere assault and decisively emphasizes the centrality of the body and sexuality in a crime which plays a crucial role in the continuing oppression of womenRethinking Rape applies current feminist theory to an urgent political and ethical issue Cahill takes an original approach by reading the subject of rape through the work of such recent continental feminist thinkers as Luce Irigaray, Elizabeth Grosz, Rosi Braidotti, and Judith Butler, who understand the body as fluid and indeterminate, a site for the negotiation of power and resistance Cahill interprets rape as an embodied, sexually marked experience, a violation of feminine bodily integrity, and a pervasive threat to the integrity and identity of a woman s personThe wrongness of rape, which has always eluded legal interpretation, cannot be defined as theft, battery, or the logical extension of heterosexual sex It is not limited to a specific event, but encompasses the myriad ways in which rape threatens the prospect of feminine agency As an explication that fully countenances women s experiences of their own bodies, Rethinking Rape helps point the way toward reparation, resistance, and the evolution of feminine subjectivity Marilyn Frye, Michigan State University Feminist Academic Press.

Is a well known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Rethinking Rape book, this is one of the most wanted Ann J Cahill author readers around the world.

Paperback  ¸ Rethinking Rape PDF/EPUB ´
    PDF Reader for the Connected World of the body and sexuality in a crime which plays a crucial role in the continuing oppression of womenRethinking Rape applies current feminist theory to an urgent political and ethical issue Cahill takes an original approach by reading the subject of rape through the work of such recent continental feminist thinkers as Luce Irigaray, Elizabeth Grosz, Rosi Braidotti, and Judith Butler, who understand the body as fluid and indeterminate, a site for the negotiation of power and resistance Cahill interprets rape as an embodied, sexually marked experience, a violation of feminine bodily integrity, and a pervasive threat to the integrity and identity of a woman s personThe wrongness of rape, which has always eluded legal interpretation, cannot be defined as theft, battery, or the logical extension of heterosexual sex It is not limited to a specific event, but encompasses the myriad ways in which rape threatens the prospect of feminine agency As an explication that fully countenances women s experiences of their own bodies, Rethinking Rape helps point the way toward reparation, resistance, and the evolution of feminine subjectivity Marilyn Frye, Michigan State University Feminist Academic Press."/>
  • Paperback
  • 230 pages
  • Rethinking Rape
  • Ann J. Cahill
  • English
  • 01 November 2018
  • 0801487188

10 thoughts on “Rethinking Rape

  1. says:

    This book is very important because it creates a new model through which to consider the wrongs of rape and how rape culture might be remedied in Western society This model is one of embodiment and intersubjectivity, and it revises the claims of Brownmiller who suggests that rape is not a sexual crime but an act of conquest and MacKinnon who considers rape to be contiguous with heterosexual sex relations generally Taking what is good about Brownmiller s and MacKinnon s arguments, Cahill re This book is very important because it creates a new model through which to consider the wrongs of rape and how rape culture might be remedied in Western society This model is one of embodiment and intersubjectivity, and it revises the claims of Brownmiller who suggests that rape is not a sexual crime but an act of conquest and MacKinnon who considers rape to be contiguous with heterosexual sex relations generally Taking what is good about Brownmiller s and MacKinnon s arguments, Cahill rethinks how and why rape happens and what we can do to prevent it

  2. says:

    Cahill starts out from the classic conflict between feminist arguments that rape is essentially violence Brownmiller, liberal feminists vs rape is essentially sex MacKinnon, Dworkin, radical feminists Cahill deftly shows that contemporary continental feminist insights into sex and the subject as corporeal and intersubjectively constituted makes clear that both positions are untenable Rape is both sex and violence While this may have already been clear according to feminist conven Cahill starts out from the classic conflict between feminist arguments that rape is essentially violence Brownmiller, liberal feminists vs rape is essentially sex MacKinnon, Dworkin, radical feminists Cahill deftly shows that contemporary continental feminist insights into sex and the subject as corporeal and intersubjectively constituted makes clear that both positions are untenable Rape is both sex and violence While this may have already been clear according to feminist conventional wisdom today, this book is nonetheless useful for tracing the implications of this fact, especially for understanding the complex harms of rape and, crucially, of the latent threat of rape in everyday life If Cahill s description of women s self defense as central to resistance is not fully developed, that s because it isn t really what this book is about She should be lauded for moving toward the question of resistance in her final chapter, rather than criticized for what she doesn t say I recommend reading Sharon Marcus Fighting Bodies, Fighting Words 1992 on resisting rape if you re interested in women s self defense she also doesn t address issues like implications for other cultural notions of femininity and the difficulties of such resistance against acquaintances and family members, but hers is an insightful account from an earlier moment in this conversation

  3. says:

    Ann Cahill begins by reviewing feminist theories of rape that have either defined it as violence not sex ala Brownmiller or not really different from regular sex ala MacKinnon She argues that neither of these theories take sufficient account of rape as an embodied experience that is both violet and sexual in a very distinct way I think that she is too dismissive of MacKinnon, who clearly recognized the violence not just the sex of rape Cahill builds her theory of rape on the sexual diff Ann Cahill begins by reviewing feminist theories of rape that have either defined it as violence not sex ala Brownmiller or not really different from regular sex ala MacKinnon She argues that neither of these theories take sufficient account of rape as an embodied experience that is both violet and sexual in a very distinct way I think that she is too dismissive of MacKinnon, who clearly recognized the violence not just the sex of rape Cahill builds her theory of rape on the sexual difference feminism of Luce Irigaray I have not read Irigaray myself, so I cannot evaluate Cahill s use of her theory Irigaray via Cahill argues that sexual difference is fundamental to humanity, and that understanding that difference enables us to understand, and celebrate, other forms of difference This sexual difference should not be understood as patriarchal biologism, nor should it be defined by any of the characteristics that are in any given context associated with women While it s clearly related to the female body and in particular genitalia, but beyond that I am unclear as to how the significance of sexual difference should be used.Cahill argues that understanding embodiment is essential to understanding subjectivity She rejects the liberal enlightenment model that defines personhood by a capacity for rationality that rests on a mind body duality Instead, she argues that embodiment leads to an intersubjectivity in which the self is defined through its relationality and dependence on others This leads her to argue that rape is best understood as sexually specific violent assault on a woman s subjectivity.She rests this argument on the idea that because one s personhood is tied to one s body, an assault on one s body is inherently an attack on one s personhood However, she does not adequately explain why a sexual assault isof an attack on personhodd than other forms of attack

  4. says:

    Another great rape theory text.

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